IDA join hands with KMC to conduct drives against tobacco consumption

first_imgKolkata: The Indian Dental Association (IDA) will join hands with the Indian Medical Association (IMA) and Kolkata Municipal Corporation in spreading awareness against the consumption of tobacco.As a part of its anti-tobacco campaign, the IDA has taken up a host of initiatives on the occasion of World No Tobacco Day on 31 May. The health awareness camp will be organised at Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital. The IDA has taken a pledge to hold various health camps to make people aware of the ill-effects of tobacco consumption in various forms. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsRallies will be held, where people from all walks of society, will take part only to highlight the danger of consuming tobacco. Various others anti-tobacco drives will also be organised on the occasion of World No Tobacco Day. IDA organises regular health talks, check-up camps and give suggestions to the state government and thus helps in implementing the anti-tobacco laws in West Bengal.India is home to one of the largest number of tobacco consumers in the world and West Bengal contributes largely to that. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedAccording to Global Adult Tobacco Survey 2010(GATS), 36.3% of the population of West Bengal uses tobacco in some form. This would amount to as many as 2.5 crore of people.Oral cancer has been on the rise. Oral cancer constitutes about 40% of all forms of cancer in our country and 30% of them stem from the use of tobacco. People from all sections of the society are victims. Strict measures should be taken to check the use of Gutkha among the people in the state and also a ban on smoking in public places. Smokeless chewing of tobacco like gutkha, khaini, paan and so on leaves people of Bengal vulnerable to various ailments. Also, cigarettes, bidis and alcohol increase the risk further. Almost in all cases, the patient comes for check up due to toothache and finds he is in a pre-cancerous state, a radiation oncologist in the city said.Dr Raju Biswas, State Secretary of the Indian Dental Association said: “Tobacco epidemic is one of the major health threats to the public health system. Our initiative is to free West Bengal from the clutches of Tobacco epidemic. It is very encouraging to get full support from the state government.”last_img read more

Heavy smokers gain more weight after quitting

first_imgHeavy smokers are likely to gain more weight after quitting than light to moderate smokers, says a new study.“This is good news for light to moderate smokers who are concerned about weight gain. It means that in the long term, quitting smoking will not make that big of an impact on their weight,” said one of the researchers Susan Veldheer from Penn State Milton S Hershey Medical Centre in Pennsylvania, US.Quitting smoking may lead to some weight gain but how much weight gain depends on the individual. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’To better understand personal factors that may contribute to weight gain, the researchers analysed data from 12,204 participants.They looked at the number of cigarettes smoked per day and body mass index before quitting, to see how these factors may have affected weight change over 10 years. What they found is that for smokers of fewer than 15 cigarettes per day, there was no significant difference in the 10-year weight gain between those who quit smoking and those who did not quit. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHowever, for smokers of 25 or more cigarettes per day and those who were obese prior to quitting —body mass index of 30 or more —the amount of weight gain attributable to quitting was substantial. Smokers of 25 or more cigarettes per day reported 23 pounds of weight gain that could be attributed to quitting cigarettes and obese smokers reported 16 pounds of weight gain that could be directly attributed to quitting.“Being able to easily identify smokers who may gain more weight when they quit is important so that we can work with patients to tailor their treatment plan,” Veldheer noted. The findings were reported in the International Journal of Obesity.last_img read more