We Must Develop a Culture of Work – PM Holness

first_img “It is clear that the policy of the Government can’t just be employment. The policy of the Government has to be to create a culture of work. Employment can only happen in a significant way when there is a culture of work where people appreciate the value of their labour. So, it’s not just the employer that must appreciate the value of labour but people themselves and that culture is not always fully spread in the population. So, an agency like HEART has to configure its program to address this issue as to why it is some of its people (who) just don’t want to work and frown upon work and I hear it coming through in some of the criticisms of the BPO industry and I would rebuke those criticisms,” said Prime Minister Holness. Story Highlights Commenting on the increase in Global Services Sector through Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) in the country and the record number of employment, Prime Minister Holness stated that the Government must increase training to support the expansion of the industry. Prime Minister Andrew Holness says the policy of the Government is not just to create employment but to create a culture of work. Prime Minister Andrew Holness says the policy of the Government is not just to create employment but to create a culture of work.Commenting on the increase in Global Services Sector through Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) in the country and the record number of employment, Prime Minister Holness stated that the Government must increase training to support the expansion of the industry.“It is clear that the policy of the Government can’t just be employment. The policy of the Government has to be to create a culture of work. Employment can only happen in a significant way when there is a culture of work where people appreciate the value of their labour. So, it’s not just the employer that must appreciate the value of labour but people themselves and that culture is not always fully spread in the population. So, an agency like HEART has to configure its program to address this issue as to why it is some of its people (who) just don’t want to work and frown upon work and I hear it coming through in some of the criticisms of the BPO industry and I would rebuke those criticisms,” said Prime Minister Holness.The Prime Minister further explained that a culture work creates an environment that limits the chances of nefarious activities.“The truth is that you have to start somewhere, and we must recognise that it is better to be employed than doing nothing becoming candidates for all kinds of nefarious activities,” stated Prime Minister Holness.In the meantime, the Prime Minister charged the BPO industry and HEART NTA to transform the way they do business.“We the Government are very seized and understand that this industry is susceptible to rapid change. My view is that the industry will not go away but it will be transformed. Artificial Intelligence will transform the industry, so Jamaica cannot rest comfortably at the level that it is in the industry. It must increase its performance levels from merely being telephone operators to absorb more of the high-value skills. So, it has to move now, significantly and rapidly from the Business Process engineering and development to more the knowledge process and we can measure how that transformation is going,” said Prime Minister Holness.In that regard, the Prime Minister noted that Jamaica is in a competitive space and must conclude on certain decisions for the greater good of the economy.“We must conclude that we have to give priority to business and investment and we must become efficient in how we give our approvals,” said Prime Minister Holness.The Prime Minister was speaking at the Official Opening Ceremony for the Montego Bay Free Zone Company Limited Data Entry Building Number 7 on Wednesday, January 9.The facility was constructed by The Port Authority of Jamaica in the Montego Bay Free Zone (MBFZ)last_img read more

Wison LNG Distributor Granted AiP by DNV GL

first_imgzoom Wison Offshore & Marine has received an approval in principle (AiP) from classification society DNV GL for its LNG Distributor (LNGD) design. The certificate was awarded at Marintec China 2017 on December 7.This AiP has been granted upon the validation of LNGD design with a specification of 10,000 cubic meter storage capacity, according to Wison.Wison LNGD is a multifunctional LNG distribution vessel, designed to deliver small LNG parcels to multiple locations. It is intended for applications in milk run and regional LNG hub distribution.Launched in April 2017, the LNGD is capable of partial cargo delivery and quick turn-around at the terminal without the need for tug assistance. Its shallow draft design is said to enable better accessibility to waters than conventional LNG carriers.“Our aim is to tap ‘last mile’ demand in global LNG market by facilitating penetration into smaller scale end markets where conventional marine logistics are unable to serve, and our LNGD concept is believed to be a tempting solution for such purpose,” Tangquan Man, Vice President at Wison Offshore & Marine who received the AiP on behalf of the company, said.last_img read more

Sunrise Ceremony A special event celebrating a story 60000 years in the

first_imgFacebook Live video provided by NITV Australia APTN NewsAustralia Day is on January 26, marking the arrival of the First Fleet of ships in Sydney’s Port Jackson – from England in 1888, to establish a penal colony.However, for many Indigenous Australians it marks the start of a process of colonization that devastated Indigenous cultural and economic society.NITV is marking this with a day of special programming, starting with an uninterrupted, dawn program called Sunrise.Sunrise will feature a traditional smoking ceremony, oral histories, cultural and contemporary performances, as well as political discussion.last_img read more

Animal rights activist says government thwarting efforts to save wild mustangs

first_img Updated: 1:43 PM Posted: October 12, 2018 Sasha Foo 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsDEL MAR (KUSI) — A prominent animal rights activist who lives in Del Mar believes the federal government is harming and killing the wild horses on her Nevada ranch.Madeleine Pickens spoke exclusively with KUSI, saying that she is at odds with the federal government over how to manage the wild horses.KUSI’s Sasha Foo has all the details in this special report. Sasha Foo, center_img Animal rights activist says government thwarting efforts to save wild mustangs Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter October 12, 2018last_img read more

5 Wacky Ways We May Soon Verify Our Identities

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now » June 17, 2016 Passwords are a pain. If we make them too simple, they’re insecure and take seconds to crack. If we make them too complex, they’re near impossible to remember. And it’s not smart to use the same password across dozens of accounts — contributing further to the inconvenience. Drawing a happy medium is incredibly difficult, and we often lack the time or willpower to sort it out.According to password management company SplashData, the most commonly used passwords in 2015 were “123456” and “password.” More creative ones include “welcome,” “starwars” and, ironically, “letmein.” We can almost hear hackers high-fiving each other in the distance.Related: Is It Time To Shelve The Password?Luckily, two-factor authentication (2FA) is around to help. It requires more than just a password or PIN; users also need to clear a second challenge before gaining access. For example, when accessing online bank accounts, users are often required to enter a password, in addition to a one-time passcode (OTP) sent to their smartphone or tablet. As a result, stolen passwords become much less valuable — unless they’re reused with other services that don’t have two-factor authentication — and our accounts are more difficult to hack.While two-factor authentication is a smart choice, it still leaves many to wonder when passwords and PINs will truly die and what viable methods will take their place. A popular option, and one already widely deployed across the globe, is biometric authentication. It can come in the form of fingerprint verification, facial recognition and retinal or iris scanning. However, it likely won’t stop there.Below are five wacky biometric methods we may one day use to verify our identities for personal or business use cases.1. Edible, electronic capsules.In 2015, Otsuka Pharmaceutical and Proteus Digital Health announced that the FDA was evaluating the world’s first drug and device combination product. It combines Otsuka’s ABILIFY tablets with Proteus’ FDA-approved ingestible sensor to measure medication-taking patterns and physiological response. While the product is yet to be approved, it verifies the possibility that edible, electronic capsules are in the realm of possibility for medical use cases, as well as others.For example, Proteus and Motorola entertained the idea of “vitamin authentication,” or the process of swallowing a small pill containing a tiny computer chip powered by stomach acid, instead of battery acid. The electronic capsule would create an 18-bit ECG-like signal, turning us into passwords or fobs capable of granting us access to our smartphones or office buildings.2. Body odor.Machines could soon take jobs away from bloodhounds trained to identify people by their scents. According to researchers at the Polytechnic University of Madrid (UPM) and Ilía Sistemas SL, there are unique characteristics in each person’s body odor that remain constant and can be used to determine identity. The biometric technique has an error rate of 15 percent in early stages of development, leaving room for improvement, but also showing promise that it could be a viable method with more fine-tuning.Related: The 12 Trends That Will Drive the Tech Conversation Over the Next YearWhile it’s bizarre to imagine our smart devices and electronics “sniffing” us to verify our identities, primary body odor is impossible to replicate and isn’t masked by secondary odors (e.g., dietary, environmental) or tertiary odors (e.g., lotions, perfumes). So in the future, we should expect to cozy up a little more with our smart devices.3. Electronic tattoos.Technology company MC10 is reshaping the health care industry with its electronic skin patches designed to monitor patient vitals, such as heart rate, in real-time to improve human health. The patches, which are thinner than human hair, can bend, stretch and twist naturally with our bodies.In addition, MC10 announced a recent partnership with custom products designer PCH to expand its application beyond the medical field. For instance, leveraging MC10’s Wearable Interactive Stamp Platform (WiSP), L’Oréal debuted an electronic tattoo called My UV Patch at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show. Other areas being explored include ticketed events, cashless payments and security, where the electronic tattoo could include our log-in credentials. MC10’s WiSP technology could very well turn us into living, breathing passwords soon.4. Brain waves.In 2013, researchers at Japan’s Tottori University published a journal on how distinctive alpha-beta brain wave patterns could determine human identities. For example, a car owner could use an EEG to record brain wave patterns that get stored in the car’s biometric security system. When someone tries to turn the car on, the security system would continuously check the driver’s brain waves for a correct match. If it’s not a match, the car will not start.More recently, researcher Blair Armstrong and his team at the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language, published a journal detailing results from a study that signaled semantic memory is a cognitive system likely to vary uniquely across individuals and could serve as an accurate biometric authentication method. Achieving 97 percent accuracy proved promising for the technique, but given the inconvenient sensor applications required around the head, along with use of electrolytic gel, there’s room for refinement before it is widely accepted. Hair gel users however, might welcome the existing method with open arms.Related: 8 Technology Trends Most Likely to Reach Widespread Adoption5. Heartbeats.Our hearts’ electrical signals are unique and hard to replicate, making them great identifiers. Authentication company Nymi created a wearable device called Nymi Band that can identify users by their cardiac rhythms in real-time. With an embedded ECG sensor and an ability to communicate with smart technologies via Bluetooth, the wearable device can unlock phones, computers, vehicles and even office or hotel doors. In fact, Nymi is set to soon release a version suitable for enterprise employees, allowing them to seamlessly open corporate office doors, unlock corporate devices and access cloud services such as email — either without a password altogether or using the wearable band as a second factor authentication method.It’s still not clear which biometric authentication methods will reign supreme in the long-term or if they will truly kill the password. However, the numerous achievements to date from researchers and technology companies alike are showing great promise. Whether the devices soak in our scent, tap into our thoughts or listen to our hearts beat, we’ll undoubtedly get swept up in the romance and welcome a more secure and convenient way to integrate with our surroundings.  6 min readlast_img read more