SMC Alum featured in art gallery

first_imgMoreau Art Galleries is featuring Saint Mary’s alum Kristin Stransky alongside Marilyn Minter, an artist recently featured in New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Though the two exhibits, which opened Friday, Aug. 30 are wildly different in medium, their themes overlap. Tiffany Bidler, assistant professor of art and director of the galleries, said her aim is to provide students with professional and educational pieces that are challenging and innovative in both content and media. “My first consideration is whether or not I feel the work will inspire students,” Bidler said. Secondly, she seeks works that engage the various missions of the college. “We educate women at Saint Mary’s College and so I try to bring in the work of women artists whose work touches on issues of gender,” she said. The Galleries’ director believes the Stransky and Minter’s exhibits, located in the Sister Rosaire and the Hammes Gallery, respectively accomplish that mission. “The Marilyn Minter exhibition that I curated considers makeup’s materiality and its role in gendered performances that elicit desire and construct femininity,” Bidler said. “My favorite work by Stransky is “Landing Strip.” It’s a brilliant piece about sexuality and boundaries.” Technology plays an integral role in both the conception and process of Stransky’s pieces, Stransky said. “Ultimately, I saw art as a vehicle to explore both ideas and creation, both intellectual and hands on,” she said. The Little Theater and Sister Rosaire galleries also previously featured Kristen Stransky’s pieces. The Saint Mary’s alumna is currently pursuing a master of fine arts in Emergent Digital Practices at the University of Denver. “Coding and other technical formats often require adherence to strict processes and syntax to create a working unit, and I like to think that I bend those rules through meaning and the application of technology to craft and sculptural mediums,” Stransky said. Bidler, an art historian, said she likes to spend time comparing works of art, especially in her classes. “Marilyn Minter is an internationally renowned contemporary artist. I first saw Green, Pink, Caviar while it was on view at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The video is very sensuous, colorful, and hypnotic – it draws you in,” Bidler said of Minter’s piece. Bidler said she loves the hypnotic quality of the Minter video, which sucks the viewer into a world of color and pleasure. “I love that the context Minter provides about the photograph of her mother is at odds with some of the assumptions we might make about her mother based on a cursory glance at the photograph. I enjoy having my assumptions challenged by other artists,” she said. Bidler said the exhibition is a comparison of early work by Marilyn Minter and a late work by Marilyn Minter, at a basic level. “It seeks to draw out themes that persist over time in her work,” she said. As for the connection between Stransky and Minter, Bidler encourages students to make their own conclusions. “I have some ideas about the thematic ties between the Kristin Stransky and Marilyn Minter exhibitions, but I’d love for viewers to come in and make these connections for themselves,” Bidler said. Moreau Center for the Arts will feature the free exhibits until Sept. 20.last_img read more

Gladbach plot cardboard cut-out fans for Bundesliga restart

first_imgIt may be a while before real fans can return to Bundesliga stadiums, but Borussia Moenchengladbach supporters are planning to fill the stands with the next best thing: 50,000 cardboard cut-outs of themselves. A deserted Borussia-Park, Borusia Moenchengladbach’s home stadium The German league is suspended until the end of April due to the coronavirus crisis, and games are expected to be played behind closed doors if and when the season resumes. Yet at fourth-placed Gladbach, fans now have the option to order a “life-size cardboard cut-out” of themselves – complete with photos of their faces – to occupy their usual spot on the terraces. “This way, we will be the first club to bring a bit of life back to our stadium, even if fans actually have to watch from home,” wrote supporter organisation Fanprojekt Moenchengladbach (FPMG) in an online statement on Wednesday.Advertisement Promoted ContentThe New Lara Croft Will Really Surprise YouWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?18 Beautiful Cities That Are Tourist MagnetsCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Things That Actually Ruin Your PhoneA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table TopWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth? Read Also: Barcelona facing €100M loss amid Covid 19 outbreakThe Bundesliga is currently on hold until April 30, with clubs set to meet later this week to discuss further plans.The league has said it hopes to play out the season in order to ensure TV revenues crucial to the financial stability of some of its clubs.Gladbach hosted the last fixture to date on March 11, when they beat local rivals Cologne in the first Bundesliga game ever to be held behind closed doors.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img For 19 euros ($21), Gladbach fans can buy the cardboard cut-out, which FPMG said would actually be made of “weather-proof plastic”. The proceeds would help to keep FPMG’s seven employees in a job, with some of the money also donated to good causes close to the club, organisers said. The figures themselves, meanwhile, are to be produced by two small firms in Moenchengladbach which have been forced to close during the crisis. “We won’t be making any profits, and when the ‘war’ is won, everyone can take home their doppelganger as a reminder of these curious times,” said FPMG. Empty seats and stands at Borussia-Park football stadium, home of Borussia Moenchengladbachlast_img read more